The Complete Journals of Lucy Maud Montgomery, The PEI Years, 1889-1900, edited by Mary Hensley Rubio and Elizabeth Hillman Waterston, Oxford University Press (published in Canada), 2012, hardcover, 484 pages.

lucymaudmontgomery_1889-1900The Project

I have embarked upon a largish reading project, a two-volume collection of the complete journals of Lucy Maud Montgomery (who went by ‘Maud’), which runs at 928 pages (volume two is slightly shorter at 444pgs).

The journals, published by Oxford University Press, cover a period of her life from 1889-1911 (roughly twenty-two years), from the tender age of fourteen to about age thirty-six. I am guessing on the end date as I am not sure what month the final journal entry in the second volume is in and she may or may not have had a birthday at that point.  When the journal opens, she’s a few months’ shy of her fifteenth birthday.

As a reference point, Anne of Green Gables (AGG) was published in 1908, and while this is certainly Montgomery’s best-known work, besides AGG, she wrote 20 novels, 530 short stories, 500 poems and 30 essays (Wikipedia.org).

My Introduction To LMM

I am in my early thirties now but I grew up on Montgomery’s work. I still have my ratty paperback copy of Anne of Green Gables which I received in my childhood years (likely from a well-meaning aunt) and although we couldn’t afford the eight-volume set, I went on to read the complete series twice, substituting books on loan from the local library.

When I became acquainted with the Kevin Sullivan films, I was enamored all over again with ‘that Anne girl’ and I am unabashedly the proud owner of the entire Anne of Green Gables series (books and DVDs), some of the Tales of Avonlea set (books, VHS), and the Emily of New Moon (books and DVDs). I have a few random paperbacks she’s published that are non-Avonlea related, like The Blue Castle, which is in my top 10 all-time favorite novels, ever.

Then there’s the non-fiction. I recently acquired Beyond Green Gables: Kevin Sullivan’s Designscapes, when it was published a few years back. There was also Anne’s Anthology: Following the Footnote Trail, Poetry Popular in the Victorian Era, by Margie Grey. I won’t get started on my 19th century poetry collection that emerged from reading Montgomery’s work.

I consider this a small collection of her work compared to many but I mention it at all just to demonstrate how vast the body of work is that we’re talking about — barely touched really in popular media (like television shows and films) — and how one author’s work can lead to so many related materials from criticisms of her work to adaptations to plays and films and of course, the journals.

Why This Collection?

It’s worth mentioning that there were a series of journals released some years back which were organized differently from this two-volume set, but I’ve elected to try this particular collection as it is arranged with the original images that Montgomery included in her journal entries, along with footnotes accompanying the text, and it is (as previously mentioned) not a collection of journal entries, but the complete set.

When this massive tome of a journal crossed my desk at work, I cracked open the cover, the hint of a smile across my lips, and immediately became immersed in author’s writing style. I had to read from the beginning.

So, where do we start?  I think the way that I would like to begin is by posting a year at a time, perhaps with the first post covering 1889-1890, as there aren’t very many entries for 1889 when she’s first starting out the journals and all of them short(er), in my opinion.

I’m about midway through reading 1890 now, so probably in the next week or so, keep an eye out here for Part 1 in the series, where I’ll be sharing my thoughts on the beginning of this journey together with Lucy Maud Montgomery.

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “The Complete Journals of Lucy Maud Montgomery, The PEI Years, 1889-1900 (Overview)

    1. The Blue Castle was one of the few, if not the only, novels written for adults by Montgomery. It has never been translated to film, despite having a clean, sweet romance story in a spectacular film-worthy setting. It is reminiscent of a fairy tale in some of its aspects, a girl going away from home and finding adventure, danger, and perhaps love. I like to think that some of Montgomery’s schoolmarm days of restlessness are embodied in Valancy. Certainly the founding Stirling clan reminds me of Cavendish, where Montgomery grew up.

      It’s also something of a literary curiosity as I’ve read that Colleen McCullough, author of The Thorn Birds (1977) and The Independence of Miss Mary Bennet (2008), was sued with a charge of plagiarism by the Montgomery heirs when her book, The Ladies of Missalongi, was released in 1987. When I heard this rumour, I searched high and low for a paperback copy I could purchase. As to the similarities between the two books, when I finished McCullough’s book, I believe I may have thrown the offensive paperback against a wall.

      Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s