vintage-1216720_1920Airing this week is a blogcast I participated in recently for Write Pack Radio on “Simplifying and Lord Tennyson” in celebration of his birthday. (Blogcast Link) His actual birthday, for those who might not know, is August 6th, 1809. There, now I’ve saved you the trouble of Googling!

From the website:

In this episode, the Write Pack explores the writing of poet Albert Lord Tennyson and simplifying our writing.
• How has Tennyson’s writing affect the stories of today?
• How can we use the simplification process work?
• How does “show don’t tell?” change based on the media you are writing?
• How has prose writing and description changed from the time of Tennyson differ from today?
And more…” (Write Pack Radio)

I don’t generally talk on the radio, especially not about 19th century British poets, but when I was invited to participate, I couldn’t help myself.  For those of you who don’t listen to podcasts, essentially when I have the courage to chime in, I’m gushing over him, more sentiment than substance, occasionally apologetic, but enjoy!

My comments at: (08:58), (16:55), (18:40) (30:21) (43:02) (45:56) (54:25) (58:46)

In hindsight, I’m sure that a polished composure during recording comes with practice and forethought. 🙂 Fedora Amis, a Victorian whodunnit writer, talks extensively about Tennyson as a lyricist and I learned quite a bit from her insightful commentary.

Full link: http://www.blogtalkradio.com/writepackradio/2016/08/07/simplifying-and-lord-tennyson

Follow Write Pack Radio on Facebook or check out future episodes at Blog Talk Radio. Enjoy!

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