Poetry
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A Poem on Sowing

I spent some time this morning, at the request of a friend, composing a short poem in honor of farming and the gradual transition from winter to the vernal season. It’s so grey here in the Midwest that thoughts of warmer weather and springtime were most welcome. This is the first time I’ve shared this work (as I literally wrote it this morning over a 90-minute period) and it is written with an A-B-C-B scheme. The inspiration for this song was Camille Saint-Saens, “Le Cygne”, from The Carnival of the Animals. I hope you enjoy it.


The Fieldworkers’ Song
by Lauren Miller

Frozen archways of leaf and twig,
Underfoot yield as we descend,
the shade of spring as yet to come,
to sundered fields from winter’s end.
Eight plodding hooves of oxen keep,
Apace with each furrowing line,
as hand steers plough, the rapids churn
up earth and stone, beneath bovine.
Embers of starlight cast abroad
on starry fields, we now await,
With hopes aloft and broadcast seeds,
in silence as our dreams gestate.

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Lauren Miller is a Midwestern born writer with a passion for Jesus, the written word, and dogs. She has seventeen years of experience in the library field and reviews books for the Historical Novels Review (UK). Lauren is the Managing Web Editor and writer for The Scribe, a web publication of the St. Louis Writers Guild, where she also serves as their Director of Communications. She likes to spend her free time enjoying period films, discovering new reads, and being surrounded by other people’s pets. Lauren, her husband, and their wily Maine Coon (who isn’t quite a dog) live in Missouri. You can learn more about Lauren’s writing at LaurenJoanMiller.com.

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