All posts filed under: Book Reviews

The Complete Journals of Lucy Maud Montgomery (Part 5)

Welcome to Part 5 of  The Complete Journals of Lucy Maud Montgomery, The PEI Years, 1889-1900. For an overview of the project, please click here. I’ve been trudging along, trying to make time to finish reading Volume 1 of this 2-volume set. It is worth mentioning at this point that the break in the two volumes is a by-product of the editors, not of L. M. Montgomery herself. The entirety of the text runs from September 21st, 1889 – April 1th, 1897 and this is considered the first volume of the author’s handwritten journal. The second volume runs from April 2th, 1897  – February 7, 1910. For the purposes of this blog series, it should be understood that the text referenced below (The Complete Journals of Lucy Maud Montgomery, The PEI Years, 1889-1900) begins on September 21st, 1889 and ends on December 22nd, 1900. As it’s been a few weeks since posting, I intend on trying to conclude this present volume in today’s post, so onward! 1897-1900 1897 was a cruel year for Maud as she struggled being a schoolteacher and …

The Complete Journals of Lucy Maud Montgomery (Part 4)

Welcome to Part 4 of  The Complete Journals of Lucy Maud Montgomery, The PEI Years, 1889-1900. For an overview of the project, please click here. 1895-1896 Montgomery begins the year cozily snug with Tennyson and doughnuts, and gets interrupted by a boy, Lou, which she laments isn’t quite as good as a fireside curled up with Tennyson and doughnuts! I adore Montgomery and hope that we would’ve been friends. As Montgomery continues her schoolmarm years (during 1895 and 1896), her publication credits begin to pile up. In March 1895, she receives notice that a poem, “On the Gulf Shore” has been accepted by the Toronto Ladies Journal and later, a story “A Baking of Gingersnaps”, published by the same in July 1895; in February 1896, a short story, “Our Charivari” was sold to the Philadelphia magazine, Golden Days; an article commissioned by the editor of the Halifax Herald, entitled “A Girl’s Place at Dalhousie College”;  and in March 1896, a poem called “Fisher Lassies” was published by The Youth’s Companion. Golden Days went on to publish …

The Complete Journals of Lucy Maud Montgomery (Part 3)

Welcome to Part 3 of  The Complete Journals of Lucy Maud Montgomery, The PEI Years, 1889-1900. For an overview of the project, please click here. 1893-1894 Maud is eighteen at the start of 1893 and home for the summer in Cavendish where Nate is rumoured to be coming home for a visit. Speculation flies that he is here to see Maud, but shall anything come of it? Maud continued to have stories published in her college’s paper, founded by Tal MacMillan (one of her schoolmates) and some of the other college boys,  and in The Ladies’ World (1886), a New York magazine. Amongst her college years, Maud doesn’t grow out of her antics — leading on a nosy landlord to believe a young man is calling for her friend instead of for her, going out for walks/rides with multiple young men over the course of the year and caring not a serious whit for any, and even passing notes during an exam! Amongst the ephemera are several photos of Lover’s Lane, Maud’s bedroom, the college where …

The Complete Journals of Lucy Maud Montgomery (Part 2)

Welcome to Part 2 of  The Complete Journals of Lucy Maud Montgomery, The PEI Years, 1889-1900. For an overview of the project, please click here. In last week’s post, I promised that this one would detail the “culmination of a summer romance” and I shall endeavor not to disappoint! 1891 In her budding sexuality, Maud is confused by Mr. Mustard’s evening calls in which he sits and talks of pre-destination and the desire to be a minister, and judging by the entries, bores her to tears. Maud’s innocent attempts to ward off “that detestable Mustard’s” (65) visits are not to be missed, some of the comic highlights of the year’s entries. As much as Maud attempts to shake off the unwelcome suitor, she embraces the flirtatious adventures with William ‘Will’ Pritchard (Laura Pritchard’s brother) and though it is obvious that she likes him, he likes her a good deal better than she does him. Although there are some mentions of Nate being away to college, he does not factor in Maud’s life at this point as a …

The Complete Journals of Lucy Maud Montgomery (Part 1)

Welcome to Part 1 of  The Complete Journals of Lucy Maud Montgomery, The PEI Years, 1889-1900. For an overview of the project, please click here. Maud’s journal begins at the young age of 14 (a few months’ shy of 15) with the beginning of a new diary, one that she’s determined will be of substance and more than just a documentation of the weather of the day. She will go on to recount her adventures and include relevant photographs of the people and places she encounters. 1889 In 1889, Lucy “Maud” Montgomery lived in Cavendish, Prince Edward Island, a small village of fishermen and farmers and their families, with her maternal grandparents, the Macneills. Maud’s own mother had died of tuberculosis when Maud was 21 months old, and her father lives in Saskatchewan with his new wife. Having never been to Cavendish myself,  I try to visualize the town from Montgomery’s descriptive writing, which reminds me of life in Avonlea, from the woods and pastures, the seashore and the magnificent skies, from stormy to sunsets. What struck me the …

The Complete Journals of Lucy Maud Montgomery, The PEI Years, 1889-1900 (Overview)

The Complete Journals of Lucy Maud Montgomery, The PEI Years, 1889-1900, edited by Mary Hensley Rubio and Elizabeth Hillman Waterston, Oxford University Press (published in Canada), 2012, hardcover, 484 pages. The Project I have embarked upon a largish reading project, a two-volume collection of the complete journals of Lucy Maud Montgomery (who went by ‘Maud’), which runs at 928 pages (volume two is slightly shorter at 444pgs). The journals, published by Oxford University Press, cover a period of her life from 1889-1911 (roughly twenty-two years), from the tender age of fourteen to about age thirty-six. I am guessing on the end date as I am not sure what month the final journal entry in the second volume is in and she may or may not have had a birthday at that point.  When the journal opens, she’s a few months’ shy of her fifteenth birthday. As a reference point, Anne of Green Gables (AGG) was published in 1908, and while this is certainly Montgomery’s best-known work, besides AGG, she wrote 20 novels, 530 short stories, 500 poems and 30 …

Love Comes Calling by Siri Mitchell (Against All Expectations #1)

Ellis Eaton, a young actress who dreams of Hollywood stardom, takes on her toughest role yet when she agrees to pose as a friend and temporarily work at the telephone exchange. If she succeeds, she’ll earn the funds she needs to skip town and make her dream a reality. When Ellis overhears a threat to Griffin Phillips, the boy everyone assumes she’ll settle down with, she commits to foiling the plot to hurt Griffin while avoiding his romantic advances.   Siri Mitchell ventures into the Roaring Twenties with a charming, but scatterbrained, heroine in Ellis whose mad-cap escapades will have you laughing at her misadventures. Mitchell’s book is well-written and has moments of (surprising) depth with a pulse on class relations and the dark side of Prohibition. Featuring a gorgeous Art Deco-influenced cover, the book also includes end notes on Prohibition and the real gangsters of Boston in the 1920’s and discussion questions for book clubs or classrooms. ———————– This review first appeared in the August 2014 issue of Historical Novel Review. I received a copy of the book for the purposes of a …

Every Tear a Memory by Myra Johnson (Till We Meet Again #3)

The Specs: EVERY TEAR A MEMORY by Myra Johnson (Till We Meet Again, Bk 3), Abingdon Press, 2014, $14.99, pb, 320pp, 9781426753725 Joanna Trapp leaves her old life in France behind when the war ends and family calls her home. But civilian life as a switchboard operator in Hot Springs, Arkansas, doesn’t have the same appeal as her formerly adventurous life as a Hello Girl for the Army Signal Corps. Thomas Ballard is a semi-successful businessman at the Arlington who was medically ineligible to serve, and although he seeks a quiet life, he finds himself attracted to Joanna’s daring spirit. The question they must answer together is whether there’s room for love when they differ in values. Johnson continues her post-WWI series, which follows female protagonists who served during the war and the Ballard men who love them. The plot here is full of flawed characters, poor choices and misunderstandings that stand in the way of love and keep the emotions relatable, whether it’s teenage angst over a boy, or the desire to be respected …